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Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 17th Visit to Georgia


Seventeenth Visit

Late September - October 14, 1929

Roosevelt was unable to return to Warm Springs until late September. As previously mentioned, he constantly preached the need for diversity in agriculture, with a special emphasis on timber as a viable cash crop. Practicing what he preached he had workers blanket much of his property with new pine seedlings—altogether 5600 news trees were planted in 1929. Roosevelt turned down offers to cut the timber from his land; though he did consider timber to be a cash crop, personally he was more interested in forest conservation and creation.

Meanwhile he continued to correspond from Warm Springs, working in references to the weather and his relaxation when he could:

“All goes well down here, except that it has rained almost constantly since we got here. . . .” Source: Elliott Roosevelt (ed.), F.D.R.: His Personal Letters 1928-1945, (Duell, Sloan and Pearce, New York, 1950), p. 74.

“I have been having such a complete rest down here that I have been very remiss in regard to my mail. . . .” Source: Elliott Roosevelt (ed.), F.D.R.: His Personal Letters 1928-1945, (Duell, Sloan and Pearce, New York, 1950), p. 84.

Always near the surface was that infectious Roosevelt sense of humor. Writing on Oct. 5 of his farming attempts in both Hyde Park and Warm Springs:

“. . . ‘Squashco Corporation Inc.’ affairs. The members of the board of directors at Warm Springs are gratified that the younger members of the squash family, after three months of heliotherapy, have been taken indoors to prevent their little tootsies from being frost-bitten. It seems to the board that all credit should not go to Moses, but at least some of it to Pharaoh’s daughter. What kind of noise did Pharaoh’s daughter make to lure Moses and the husky youngsters from the bullrushes. It seems almost cannibalistic that these children will in the course of this coming winter make Child’s fare. There will shortly be an opportunity for ‘Squashco’ to absorb the ‘Pine Mountain Water Melon Corporation,’ which ought to afford our holding company a glorious opportunity for hydrating the stock. Another offer will shortly be made for the sale of the ‘Shiloh Valley Beef Cattle Co.’ This also looks attractive, as we can afford to sell a little more ‘bull.’ . . .” Source: Elliott Roosevelt (ed.), F.D.R.: His Personal Letters 1928-1945, (Duell, Sloan and Pearce, New York, 1950), p. 81-2.

October 24-29, 1929 - Beginning with panic selling of stock on October 24 (Black Thursday), and culminating on Ocotber 29, (Black Tuesday), the stock market crashed. Over 16 million shares were traded on this day (an average day was around 3 million), most of them being sold. Stock prices plummeted and many people lost fortunes, some even their life savings in this financial disaster. While the matter is too complicated to assign a specific starting point, the stock market crash of 1929 was the defining moment which brought the “roaring twenties” days of prosperity to an end and ushered in the Great Depression.