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Joint Resolution of the Georgia General Assembly relative to separation of the races in the U.S. mil


Joint Resolution of the Georgia General Assembly

Feb. 8, 1955
   

SEPARATION OF RACES IN FEDERAL ARMED FORCES—PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO FEDERAL CONSTITUTION.

No. 18 (House Resolution No. 36-130a).

A Resolution.

Memorializing Congress to call a convention for the consideration of an amendment to the Constitution of the United States relative to service in the armed forces of the United States.

Whereas, the National Government, now requires members of the armed forces of the National Government to serve in units with members of other races; and

Whereas, members of the Armed Forces of the National Government should be allowed to serve with members of their own race; and

Whereas, the State of Georgia is desirous of enabling members of the armed forces of the National Government to serve with members of their own race;

Now, therefore, be it resolved by the General Assembly of Georgia, that the legislature of the State of Georgia respectfully petitions the Congress of the United States to call a convention for the purpose of proposing the following article as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States:

“Article”

Section 1. “No person shall be required to serve in any unit of the armed forces of the United States not composed of members of his own race if, at the time of entering the armed forces of the United States, he has expressed a preference to serve in units composed of members of his own race.

Section 2. “Nothing in this Article shall be deemed to preclude the assignment of any individual who belongs to a race comprising less than one per centum of the population of the United States to units containing enlisted personnel of the most numerous race in the United States, if the Secretary of the armed forces concerned has determined that it is impractical to organize units composed of members of his race.

Section 3. “Any officer of the armed forces who knowingly and willfully denies to any person his rights to express a preference upon enlistment as provided in this Article, or assigns any person after enlistment or induction to any unit in violation of the provisions of this Article shall be guilty of conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman and shall be subject to trial and punishment.

Section 4. “This amendment shall be effective upon ratification by three-fourths of the several States.”

Be it further resolved, that the Congress of the United States be, and it hereby is, requested to provide as to the mode of ratification, that the amendment shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of the Constitution of the United States, when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States.

Be it further resolved, that a duly attested copy of this resolution be immediately transmitted to the Secretary of the Senate of the United States, the Clerk of the House of Representatives of the United States, and to each member of the Congress from the State of Georgia.

Approved February 8, 1955.

Ga. Laws 1955, pp. 185-187.