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Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 25th Visit to Georgia


Twenty-fifth Visit

November 23 - December 6, 1932

After the election Roosevelt soon took a well earned visit to Warm Springs to rest, recuperate, and prepare to lead the nation in the face of an ever deepening economic crisis. Strangely, while the campaign severed the friendship between Roosevelt and Al Smith, Roosevelt remained on decent terms with his Republican opponent, Herbert Hoover. In fact writing to a friend soon before leaving for Warm Springs, Roosevelt said:

“. . . I am getting away to Warm Springs next week, but as you know must stop off at Washington to see the President. . . .” Source: Elliott Roosevelt (ed.), F.D.R.: His Personal Letters 1928-1945, (Duell, Sloan and Pearce, New York, 1950), p. 306.

Roosevelt and Hoover would ride in the same car to his inauguration.

Always aware of the “forgotten man” (the title of one of his radio addresses) and children, Roosevelt wrote to the young daughter of one of his main campaign organizers:

“I loved getting your letter with the two dollars to help with the campaign. Thanks you many times. I hope to see you some day.” Source: Elliott Roosevelt (ed.), F.D.R.: His Personal Letters 1928-1945, (Duell, Sloan and Pearce, New York, 1950), p. 306.

Also acknowledging the heavy hitters, Roosevelt wrote Senator Thomas J. Walsh:

“Now that the smoke of battle has cleared away, I want to write to tell you how very grateful I am for all that you did during the campaign. I feel that you know how much I appreciate your hard and most effective work on the campaign trips with me and I realize with a feeling of deep gratitude the long hours you spent on those hot, tiring days. When the victory arrived, I know that you must have felt a tremendous pride that you had had such a large part in it.” Source: Elliott Roosevelt (ed.), F.D.R.: His Personal Letters 1928-1945, (Duell, Sloan and Pearce, New York, 1950), p. 307.

Walsh soon would be offered the position of Attorney General.