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Franklin D. Roosevelt’s 18th Visit to Georgia


Eighteenth Visit

Circa November 20 - December 6, 1929

Roosevelt returned to Warm Springs for his annual Thanksgiving trip, and remarked in a letter to a friend how much he was enjoying himself (despite the bad weather) and how quickly Warm Springs was growing:

“Ever so many thanks for that perfectly grand basket which the further we go down into gives more and more surprises. I am showing great restraint but Missy [his secretary] has sampled everything and I fear the worst. I do wish you were both down here even though the weather is vile. They have had a rainy cold autumn and it is not far above the freezing point at the present time. And the flue of the furnace is stopped up and so is my nose. . . . Last night we sat down one hundred and seventy-five strong at the Foundation dinner at the Inn,—last year there were 103, in 1927 there were 49, and in 1926, 7, so you see how we grow.” Source: Elliott Roosevelt (ed.), F.D.R.: His Personal Letters 1928-1945, (Duell, Sloan and Pearce, New York, 1950), p. 89-90.

While Roosevelt, or anyone else, could yet foresee the terrible consequences of the stock market crash of October 29, it did not escape his notice even in south Georgia. Writing to a friend on December 1:

“Here are the sheets from our final liquidation sale of our late lamented friend Max William to be held at the Anderson Galleries this Wednesday evening, December 4 at 8:15 p.m. It is just possible that the recent little Flurry down town will make the prices comparatively low. . . ..” Source: Elliott Roosevelt (ed.), F.D.R.: His Personal Letters 1928-1945, (Duell, Sloan and Pearce, New York, 1950), p. 92.

The “recent little Flurry” referred to the stock market crash. Obviously it quickly became a matter of national concern, and Roosevelt’s opinions were wanted, but he was hesitant to offer them publicly—for fear people might think he was campaigning for higher office—which he had not seriously considered—yet. On December 5, one day before returning to New York, he wrote:

“. . . It is my thought that I should avoid in so far as possible a discussion of national issues except in most general terms for the very good reason that a whole lot of my well-meaning but silly friends will talk about my throwing my hat in the ring and their equally unjustified stories. It is difficult enough to be Governor of New York without taking on added burdens!” Source: Elliott Roosevelt (ed.), F.D.R.: His Personal Letters 1928-1945, (Duell, Sloan and Pearce, New York, 1950), p. 93.