Statues, Monuments, and Historical Plaques

Paul Anderson Statue


Source: David Seibert

Located in the Paul Anderson Memorial Park at the intersection of Big A Road (GA 17) and E Tugalo Street, Toccoa. See also GeorgiaInfo biographical information on Paul Anderson.

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WPA Plaque


Source: Richard Ward

This plaque is embedded in the sidewalk in Arlington, Georgia (border of Calhoun and Early Counties)

(Text)

Constructed by WPA AD 1939-40

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William Amborse Wright


Source: Ed Jackson

WILLIAM AMBROSE WRIGHT PLAQUE

Located under a tree on the northeastern corner of the Georgia State Capitol square, Atlanta, Ga.

(text)

TO THE MEMORY OF

WILLIAM AMBROSE WRIGHT

BORN AT LOUISVILLE GEORGIA, JANUARY 19, 1844.

DIED AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA SEPTEMBER 13, 1929:

SOLDIER, STATESMAN, AND CHRISTIAN KNIGHT:

A GALLANT OFFICER IN THE ARMY OF THE CONFEDERATE

STATES OF AMERICA; FOR FIFTY YEARS COMPTROLLER

GENERAL OF THE COMMONWEALTH; GUARDIAN OF ITS HONOR AND ITS PEOPLE’S FRIEND. A GENTLEMAN

IN WHOM LIVED THE GRACES, THE VIRTUES AND THE

HEROISMS OF THE OLD SOUTH:

THIS TREE IS LOVINGLY PLANTED, AND THIS

TABLET REVERENTLY INSCRIBED BY

THE ATLANTA LADIES MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION

JANUARY 19, 1930.

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World is My Parish


Source: Ed Jackson

WORLD IS MY PARISH HISTORIC PLAQUE

Located at the rear of the Visitor’s Center, Fort Frederica National Monument, St. Simons Island, Ga.

(text)

THE WORLD IS MY PARISH

ACCOMPANYING

GENERAL JAMES OGLETHORPE

TO THIS ISLAND IN 1736 WERE

JOHN AND CHARLES WESLEY

LEADERS IN THE EVANGELICAL MOVEMENT

AND FOUNDERS OF

THE METHODIST CHURCH

THEIR FAITH AND FIDELITY ARE KNOWN

THROUGHOUT THE WORLD

ERECTED BY THE ASSOCIATION OF

METHODIST HISTORICAL SOCIETIES

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Roswell King


Source: Ed Jackson

ROSWELL KING PLAQUE Located in the Roswell town square, Roswell, Ga.

(text)

ROSWELL KING

1839

“HE WAS FOUNDER OF THE VILLAGE WHICH BEARS HIS NAME. A MAN OF GREAT ENERGY, INDUSTRY AND PERSEVERANCE: OF RIGID INTEGRITY, TRUTH AND JUSTICE. HE EARLY EARNED AND LONG ENJOYED THE ESTEEM AND CONFIDENCE OF HIS FELLOW MEN.” 1939

ROSWELL KING, SON OF SARAH FITCH AND TIMOTHY KING, WAS BORN AT WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT, ON MAY 3, 1765. HE MOVED TO DARIEN, GEORGIA, IN 1788 AND BECAME A LEADER IN THE RELIGIOUS, CIVIC AND BUSINESS LIFE OF THE COMMUNITY. IN THE EARLY 1820’S THE BANK OF DARIEN HAVING LARGE HOLDINGS IN THE GOLD FIELDS OF NORTHERN GEORGIA AND NORTH CAROLINA SENT ROSWELL KING INTO THESE FIELDS TO ATTEND TO ITS INTERESTS. IT WAS ON THIS TRIP THAT HE CROSSED THE CHATTAHOOCHEE RIVER NEAR THE MOUTH OF VICKERY – NOW BIG – CREEK, AND THEN HE VISUALIZED FOR THE FIRST TIME THE COLONY THAT WAS TO BEAR HIS NAME BEING IMPRESSED BY THE WATER POWER VICKERY CREEK AFFORDED. THE HEALTHFUL CLIMATE, THE ABUNDANCE OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND THE GENERAL BEAUTY OF THE SECTION HE DECIDED TO MAKE IT HIS HOME.

A SHORT TIME LATER HE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS SON BARRINGTON, MADE ANOTHER TRIP FROM THE LOW COUNTRY TO THIS UNSETTLED AREA OF THE CHEROKEE COUNTRY. BARRINGTON KING WAS MORE ENTHUSIASTIC THAN HIS FATHER OVER THE POTENTIALITIES OF THE SECTION DESTINED TO BE THE SITE OF ROSWELL. WITH THIS ENCOURAGEMENT, ROSWELL KING CAME AGAIN, ABOUT 1830, TO THIS THE LAND OF HIS DESIRE AND BY 1835 HE HAD ACQUIRED SUFFICIENT LANDS FOR HIS NEEDS AND CONSTRUCTION WAS BEGUN ON A COTTON MILL. BY MARCH 4, 1839, THE MILL WAS COMPLETED AND BECAME THE MAIN BUSINESS INTEREST OF THE COMMUNITY.

A FEW WEEKS LATER BARRINGTON KING, WITH HIS FAMILY, ARRIVED AND THE SON BEGAN TO TAKE RESPONSIBILITIES FROM THE SHOULDERS OF THE FATHER. THE KINGS MISSED THEIR ACCUSTOMED COMMUNITY LIFE AND TO ENLARGE THE COLONY OFFERED BUILDING SITES TO FRIENDS AND RELATIVES ON CONDITION THAT THEY COME AND BUILD PERMANENT HOMES. THE OFFER WAS ACCEPTED AND BY 1839 A COLONY OF SIX FAMILIES EXISTED. THE COLONISTS THEN COMPLETED THE BUILDING OF A PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, AN ACADEMY AND THEIR PERMANENT HOMES. THESE BUILDINGS EXEMPLIFIED OF THE ACADEMY REMAIN TO THIS DAY.

THUS A VISION BECAME A REALITY AND THE COMMUNITY FOUNDED WAS CALLED ROSWELL IN HONOR OF THE MAN WHO FIRST ENVISAGED THE POSSIBILITIES OF THE SITE AND WHO WAS THE MOST BELOVED CITIZEN OF THE COMMUNITY UNTIL HIS DEATH, FEBRUARY 15, 1844.

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Riverview Carousel


Source: Ed Jackson

Riverview Carousel Historical Plaque

Located at the Riverview Carousel in Six Flags Over Georgia Park in Cobb County off I-20 just west of the Fulton County line 33.76677, -84.5071

(Text)

RIVERVIEW CAROUSEL

CONSTRUCTED 1908

HAS BEEN PLACED ON THE

NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

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Morris Marion Bryan


Source: Ed Jackson

Morris Bryan Historical Plaque Located at eastern end of covered bridge over South Fork Broad River in Watson Mill State Park, southeast of Comer, Ga.

(Text)

MORRIS MARION BRYAN 1889 - 1948

THE 130 ACRES COMPRISING THIS PARK WERE DONATED IN 1968 TO THE STATE OF GEORGIA IN MEMORY OF MORRIS M. BRYAN BY THE JEFFERSON MILLS, INC. WHICH HE FOUNDED IN 1916.

HE ACQUIRED THIS PROPERTY FOR HIS COMPANY IN 1932. IT PRODUCED ELECTRIC POWER FOR THE CRAWFORD TEXTILE DIVISION – 12 MILES WEST OF HERE FOR MANY YEARS.

DURING HIS LIFETIME HE SERVED AND CONTRIBUTED TO HIS FELLOWMAN IN MANY CIVIC, EDUCATIONAL AND RELIGIOUS ENDEAVORS.

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L.Q.C. Lamar


Source: Ed Jackson

BIRTHPLACE OF

LUCIUS QUINTUS CINCINNATUS LAMAR

BORN SEPTEMBER 17, 1825

PUTNAM COUNTY GEORGIA

COMMISSIONER OF THE CONFEDERATE

GOVERNMENT TO EUROPE, SENATOR

OF THE UNITED STATES, SECRETARY OF

INTERIOR AND ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES.

W.P.A. 1936

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Lafayette


Source: Ed Jackson

LAFAYETTE PLAQUE Located near the Lafayette Monument in the town square, LaGrange, Ga.

(text)

LAFAYETTE

Born at the Chateau de Chavaniac, Auvergne, France, on September 6, 1757, Gilbert Motier de Lafayette became at age 19 a major general on George Washington’s staff. He played a vital role in the defeat of General Charles Cornwallis at Yorktown, October 19, 1781, ending the American Revolution.

Later in France Lafayette was commanding general of the National Guard. Leader in the movement that gave France a republican form of government, author of the Declaration of the Rights of Man, and designer of the “Cocarde of Liberty” which he holds in his hand.

LaGrange, Georgia, was named for Lafayette’s home, the Chateau de LaGrange, on motion of Julius C. Alford, when this city was chartered on December 16, 1828, honoring Lafayette, who crossed the Chattahoochee below LaGrange on March 30, 1825.

This statue of Lafayette is an exact copy of the original by Ernest-Eugene Hiolle (1834-1886) that stands in Le Puy, Auvergne, France. It was cast by American sculptor Harry Jackson at his Wyoming Foundry Studies, Camaiore, Italy, in 1974.

Permission to cast the statue was granted by May Celestin Quincieu and the City Council of Le Puy. It is the property of LaGrange College, on permanent loan to the city of LaGrange.

The statue and renovation of fountain are gifts of Callaway Foundation, Inc.

1975

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John B. Gordon


Source: Ed Jackson

John B. Gordon Historical Plaque

Located on the base of the John B. Gordon Monument on the northwest corner of the Georgia State Capitol Square, Atlanta, Ga.

(Text)

John Brown Gordon, son of the Rev. Zachariah Herndon Gordon and Mrs. Malinda Cox Gordon, was born in Upson County Feb. 6, 1832. He attended a rural school in Walker County, Pleasant Green Academy in LaFayette, and the University of Georgia. He left the University in his senior year to study law under the noted Logan E. Bleckly, but soon gave up the practice of law to join his father in coal mine operations in Northwest Georgia.

At the beginning of the War Between the States, John B. Gordon organized a company of mountaineers who wore coonskin caps and called themselves “The Raccoon Roughs.” When his company was merged with the 6th Alabama Infantry Regiment of the Confederate Army, Captain Gordon was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment. Early in 1862 he became a Colonel and later that year had fought up to the rank of Brigadier General. On May 14, 1864, he was promoted to Major General and had been recommended for the rank of Lieutenant General when the war ended, at which time he was in command of half of The Army of Northern Virginia.

Douglas Southall Freeman, in “Lee’s Lieutenants,” wrote: “If the final order of march had been arranged to honor those who had fought hardest and with highest distinction during the last days of the war. Gordon rightly would have been put first.” In 1873, General Gordon was elected to the United States Senate. He was re-elected in 1878, but resigned in 1880 to develop mining and railroad interests. In 1886 he was elected Governor of Georgia and re-elected in 1888. At the end of his second term he was sent to the United States Senate for the third time, serving from 1891 to 1897. He died on January 9, 1904, while visiting his son, Hugh Haralson Gordon, in Miami.

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Great Buffalo Lick


Source: David Seibert

Buffalo Lick Historical Plaque Located aat US 278 and Buffalo Lick Road east of Union Point 33.60620, -83.05348

(Text)

GREAT BUFFALO LICK This site is described in the Treaty signed by the Creek and Cherokee Indians at Augusta, Georgia, in 1773. Here began the survey of the ceded lands.

W.P.A. 1936

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Fort Frederica


Source: Ed Jackson

FORT FREDERICA HISTORIC PLAQUE

Located at the rear of the Visitor’s Center, Fort Frederica National Monument, St. Simons Island, Ga.

(text)

FORT FREDERICA

In 1736, on this historic site, Fort Frederica was constructed by the early settlers of the Colony of Georgia under General James Edward Oglethorpe. It was the strongest fortification built by Great Britain on American soil and its purpose was to protect Georgia and the colonies to the north from the Spaniards who were already established in Florida.

In 1742, six years later, more than 3,000 Spanish troops landed in 52 vessels at Gascoigne Bluff on St. Simons island. The British forces advanced to meet them and decisively defeated the Spaniards in the Battle of Bloody Marsh. Thus Fort Frederica fulfilled the purpose for which it was built and Georgia remained a British colony. In 1903 after more than a century and a half of disuse and decay the small remaining ruins were conveyed to Mrs. Belle Stevens Taylor to Mrs. Georgia Pace King Wilder as president of the Georgia Society of Colonial Dames of America, who sought to preserve and restore Fort Frederica. In this patriotic undertaking they were assisted by generous citizens of Georgia and other states who formed the Fort Frederica Association and rendered aid in money, property, and services to make this land available for restoration. In 1945 their efforts were rewarded when the United States Government established Fort Frederica National Monument.

THIS TABLET PRESENTED

BY FORT FREDERICA ASSOCIATION

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FDR Railroad Depot


Source: David Seibert

FDR Railroad Depot Historical Plaque Located at the old depot at junction of US 27 and Ga. 85W in Warm Springs

(Text)

This tablet marks the site of the railroad depot where Franklin D. Roosevelt arrived and departed on his various visits to Warm Springs, during the years 1924-1945. Here, April 1939, his parting word was: “I’ll see you in the fall if we don’t have war —– I hate war.” From here, all that was mortal of the 32D President of the United States was borne to his resting place at Hyde Park, New York, April 13, 1945.

Placed by Franklin D. Roosevelt Warm Springs Memorial Commission, April 12, 1955

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Commemorating the Wayside Home


Source: Ed Jackson

Confederate Wayside Home Historical Plaque Corner of Fluker St. and Sibley Ave., Union Point 33.61522, -83.07593

(Text)

COMMEEMORATING THE CONFEDERATE WAYSIDE HOME 1862-1864. WHOSE ACTIVITIES WERE CARRIED ON BY FOURTEEN WOMEN OF UNION POINT.

W.P.A. 1936

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Committees who Carried on the the Wayside Home


Source: Ed Jackson

The Two Committees Wayside Home Historical Plaque Located on Thornton St. at Carlton Ave. Union Point 33.61565, -83.07526

(Text)

THE TWO COMMITTEES WHO ALTERNATED WEEKLY IN CARRYING ON THE WAYSIDE HOME

MRS. JAS. B. HART MRS. P.W. PRINTUP MRS. M.L. WATSON MRS. L. BYNUM MRS. MARTHA E. FORESTER MRS. IRA BROWN MRS. DR. B.F. CARLTON MRS. RICHARD DILWORTH MRS. PHILIP YONGE MRS. E.A. WAGNON MRS. DR. W.A. MOORE MISS. JULIA WAGNON MRS. J.C. DEAL MRS. SUSAN HUTCHINS MRS. DR. B.F. CARLTON MRS. JAS. B. HART SECY. TREAS.

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Andrew Jackson Troops


Source: Buz Hopper and Martin Penny

Andrew Jackson Troops Historical Plaque Located at the intersection of Atlanta Highway (GA 13) and Hog Mountain Rd, Flowery Branch (across the road from the Atlanta Falcons Training Facility in Hall County).

(Text)

This boulder marks the trail of Gen. Andrew Jackson and his troops who rested here for the night in 1818 Erected by the Col. Wm. Candler Chapter D.A.R. Gainesville, Hall Co., Georgia 1928

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Major Ridge Historical Plaque


Source: David Seibert

Major Ridge Historical Plaque Located in front of “Chieftans,” the Major Ridge home, at 501 Riverside Parkway, Rome (Floyd County)

(Text)

MAJOR RIDGE, PRINCIPAL CHIEF OF THE CHEROKEE TRIBE OF INDIANS, MOVED TO THIS SPOT ABOUT 1794 AND BUILT THIS DWELLING. MODERNIZED BY LATER OWNERS, HIS FERRY & TRADING POST MADE THIS FARM A TRIBAL CENTER. HERE WAS NEGOTIATED FINAL TREATY FOR THE CHEROKEE REMOVAL, 1835-1838

W.P.A. 1936

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Olympic Flame Tower


Source: Ed Jackson

1996 Summer Olympic Flame Tower, Atlanta

The 1996 Summer Olympic Flame Tower was originally part of the Olympic Stadium. Following the Olympics, the stadium was reconfigured for use by the Atlanta Braves baseball team. Also, the Olympic Flame Tower was moved one block north of the stadium.

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Iron Horse


Source: David Seibert

The “Iron Horse” is a 10-foot-high, one-ton abstract sculpture of a horse crafted in iron by University of Georgia artist Abbott Pattison in 1954. The front of Reed Hall dormitory was selected as the campus setting to display the work. However, students immediately reacted negatively to the abstract sculpture. Twice during the night of May 27, 1954, straw was placed around it and set on fire, and the word “Front” was painted on the horse’s neck. University officials quickly moved the controversial sculpture to a secret hiding place. Eventually, it was loaned to an agricultural professor who placed in the middle of a field on his farm in Greene County, where it can be seen today from Ga. 15 just north of the Oconee River.

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Women of the Confederacy Memorial


Source: John North

Memorial to women of the Confederacy (left) next to a statue of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest. Originally located on Broad St. in downtown Rome, Ga., the two statues were moved in 1952 to the base of Myrtle Hill Cemetery.

This monument was funded through donations from the Rome Camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and local individuals and organizations and presented by the SCV as a gift to the city of Rome on March 9, 1910.

Approximately 20 feet in height, with a 10-foot square base, the marble statue was sculpted by J. Wolz of Savannah and erected by the Georgia Granite and Marble Co. of Rome. On opposite sides of the base are two carvings – one showing a woman nursing a wounded soldier and the other depicting a mother telling her daughter of her father’s death in battle. On the two other sides of the base are the following inscriptions:

She was obedient to the God she adored And true to every vow she made to man. She was loyal to the country she loved so well, And upon its alter laid husband, sire, and son. The home she loved to serve was graced With sincerity of life and devotion to heart. She reared her sons to unselfish chivalry And her daughters to spotless purity. Her children delight to give her honor And love to Speak her praise.

Whose purity, whose fidelity, whose courage, whose gentle Genius in love and in counsel kept the home secure, the family A school of virtue, the State a court of honor; who made of War a season of heroism and of peace a time of healing; the Guardians of our tranquillity and of our strength.

One of the inscriptions was composed by Mercer University president G.A. Nunnally, while the other was written by Princeton University president and future U.S. president Woodrow Wilson.

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Confederate Monument Rome


Source: Ed Jackson

Confederate monument, in Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Rome, Ga.

(Text)

ERECTED BY THE WOMEN OF ROME

TO THE MEMORY OF

THE SOLDIERES OF FLOYD COUNTY, GEORGIA,

WHO DIED IN DEFENCE OF

THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA

1861 - 1865.

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Confederate Monument Macon


Source: Ed Jackson

Confederate statue erected in 1879 in downtown Macon

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Confederate Monument Lexington


Source: Ed Jackson

Confederate Monument, in Oglethorpe County Courthouse Square, Lexington

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Prisoners of War Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

This statue, entitled “Prisoners of War,” appears at the Andersonville National Historic Site in Andersonville, Ga. Sculpted by the late William J. Thompson, the statue shows three figures that represent humanity, suffering, and death. Thompson also sculpted the Richard B. Russell statue on the grounds of Georgia’s state capitol.

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Kneeling Woman Statue


Source: Georgia Department of Industry, Trade and Tourism

Located at the Andersonville National Historic Site.

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Joseph E. Johnston Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Located in Downtown Dalton, Ga.

(Text on Monument)

JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON

1807 - 1891

BRIGADIER GENERAL U.S.A.

GENERAL C.S.A.

GIVEN COMMAND OF THE CONFEDERATE

FORCES AT DALTON IN

  1. HE DIRECTED THE 79 DAYS

CAMPAIGN TO ATLANTA, ONE OF THE

MOST MEMORABLE IN THE ANNALS OF WAR

ERECTED BY BRYAN M. THOMAS

CHAPTER UNITED DAUGHTERS OF

CONFEDERACY DALTON, GEORGIA 1912

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Jefferson Davis Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

Jefferson Davis Monument at the Jeff Davis County Courthouse, Hazlehurst

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Jefferson Davis Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

Memorial to Confederate president Jefferson Davis located one mile north of Irwinville, Ga. at the site where he was captured by Union troops. Irwinville is a small unincorporated community located 14 miles east of I-75 in Irwin County in south Georgia [see map].

The monument, sculpted by Laurence Tompkins, has the following inscriptions:

[front]

JEFFERSON DAVIS

PRESIDENT

OF THE

CONFEDERATE STATES

OF AMERICA

1861 - 1865

[reverse]

ON THIS SPOT

MAY 10, 1865

PRESIDENT JEFFERSON DAVIS

WAS MADE A

PRISONER OF WAR

BY FEDERAL TROOPS

ERECTED BY THE

STATE OF GEORGIA

EUGENE TALMADGE, GOVERNOR

IN THE YEAR 1935

SPONSORED BY MARY V. HENDERSON

CHAPTER AND THE GEORGIA DIVISION

OF THE UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE

CONFEDERACY

MRS. RALPH H. JOHNSON

CHAIRMAN MEMORIAL

COMMITTEE

MRS. T.W. REED

PRESIDENT GEORGIA

DIVISION

MRS. L. W. GREENE STATE CHM.

MARKING HISTORIC GA.

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Carl Vinson Monument


Source: Ken Moser

Located in Coleman Hill Park, across street from Hay House in Macon N 32° 50.473 W 083° 37.990

Text:

IM MEMORY OF CARL VINSON

Plaque (Left)

*** Carl Vinson ***

Carl Vinson served in the United States House of Representatives for 50 years – the longest continuous service in history – from 1914 to 1964, a tenure that extended during the terms of nine presidents from Woodrow Wilson to Lyndon Johnson. A fervent believer that peace can only be maintained if the country’s defenses are strong. Mr. Vinson was known as one of the nation’s most stalwart and influential supporters of a strong national defense. He was chairman of the House Naval Affairs Committee for 16 years and of the Armed Services Committee for 14 years. In matters of national defense his influence came to be regarded as second only to that of the President.

From 1951 until his retirement the congressional district he represented included Macon and Bibb County, and he was instrumental in the location within the middle Georgia area of many projects of great benefit to Macon. He was primarily responsible for the construction of Robins Air Force Base in Warner Robins and played a leading role in assuring that I-75 and I-16 passed through Macon. Mr. Vinson was a leader in founding the Mercer Medical School, and his efforts were vital to the construction of Lake Tobesofkee, the construction of Cochran Field (now Macon’s Municipal Airport), the new Federal Building on College Street in Macon, and the Naval Ordinance Plant, the reactivation of Camp Wheeler near Macon during World War II, and the naming of a dirigible and naval vessel for the city of Macon, all came about primarily as a result of his efforts.

Carl Vinson was born November 18, 1883, near Milledville, Georgia, and spent his formative years in that city. After his graduation from Mercer University Law School in Macon in 1902, he practiced law, was appointed Baldwin County Court Solicitor, was elected to two terms of the Georgia Legislature, and served as Judge of Baldwin County Court. A life-long Democrat, he was elected in 1914 to the U.S. House of Representatives and was sworn in November 5 of that year as the youngest member of Congress.

From 1917 until his retirement, Mr. Vinson was a member of first the Naval Affairs Committee and then the Armed Services Committee into which the Naval Affairs Committee was merged. Throughout that time he played a leading role in defense matters, and his influence was enhanced in 1931 when he became chairman of the Naval Affairs Committee and in 1949 when he became chairman of the Armed Service Committee.

Plaque (Right)

Not only did Mr. Vinson believe that a strong national defense is essential to peace, he regarded national defense as a non-partisan matter:

“… My country and its safety come ahead of any party…”

These two principles and his belief in civilian control of the military guided him throughout his career.

Between 1931 and 1940, as a result of bills passed through Chairman Vinson’s Naval Affairs Committee, the Navy was almost completely rebuilt, greatly increasing its preparedness for World War II. So influential was he in naval affairs that he often referred to “My Navy” and others often referred to him as “The Admiral”. When World War II came Mr. Vinson sponsored and guided through the house a myriad of bills dealing with all aspects of the war effort. In speaking of his accomplishments between 1935 and 1945, Admiral William D. Leahy said,

“In my opinion, the Georgia Representative had, in the past decade, contributed more to the national defense than any other single person, except the the President himself.”

Mr. Vinson was among the first to recognize the importance of air power and worked throughout his career to strengthen military aviation. Later he supported the establishment of a separate air force, the founding of the Air Force Academy, and the maintenance of a strong strategic air arm.

After World War II Mr. Vinson continued to be the recognized authority and leader in Congress on defense matters and worked to modernize and strengthen all of the armed services until his retirement in 1964.

On October 24, 1964 he was presented the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the country’s highest civillian award.

Upon his retirement, Mr. Vinson returned to his farm near Milledgeville and continued to lead a productive life until his death on June 1, 1981. Never forgetting his own words:

“The surest way to prevent war is to be prepared for it.”

Monument donated by Friends of Carl Vinson - August 1987

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Alexander Stephens Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue located in front of Liberty Hall in Crawfordville, Ga.

Inscription at Base of Monument

(Front)

BORN FEB. 11, 1812, MEMBER GA. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 1836 TO 1840, MEMBER GA. STATE SENATE 1842, MEMBER U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 1843 TO 1859, RETIRED FROM CONGRESS 1859, VICE PRESIDENT CONFEDERATE STATES, 1861 TO 1865, U.S. SENATOR ELECT FROM GEORGIA, 1866, MEMBER U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 1873 TO 1882, GOVERNOR OF GEORGIA 1882, DIED IN ATLANTA, GA., SUNDAY MORNING MARCH 4, 1883.

AUTHOR OF “A CONSTITUTIONAL VIEW OF THE WAR BETWEEN THE STATES’ AND OF A COMPENDIUM OF THE HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES FROM THEIR EARLIEST SETTLEMENT TO 1872

(Side)

THROUGHOUT LIFE A SUFFERER IN BODY, MIND, AND SPIRIT, HE WAS A SIGNAL EXEMPLAR OF WISDOM, COURAGE, FORTITUDE, PATIENCE, AND UNWEARYING CHARITY, IN THE DECREPITUDE OF AGE, CALLED TO BE GOVERNOR OF THE STATE. HE DIED, WHILE IN PERFORMANCE OF THE WORK OF HIS OFFICE, AND IT SEEMED FIT, THAT HAVING SURVIVED PARENTS, BRETHREN, SISTERS, AND MOST OF THE DEAR COMPANIONS OF YOUTH, HE SHOULD LAY HIS DYING HEAD UPON THE BOSOM OF HIS PEOPLE.

(Side)

“I AM AFRAID OF NOTHING ON EARTH, OR ABOVE THE EARTH, OR UNDER THE EARTH, EXCEPT TO DO WRONG – THE PATH OF DUTY I SHALL EVER ENDEAVOR TO TRAVEL, ‘FEARING NO EVIL’ AND DREADING NO CONSEQUENCES.”

“HERE SLEEP THE REMAINS OF ONE WHO DARED TO TELL THE PEOPLE THEY WERE WRONG WHEN HE BELEIVED [SIC] SO, AND WHO NEVER INTENTIONALLY DECEIVED A FRIEND OR BETRAYED EVEN AN ENEMY.”

EXTRACTS FROM AUGUSTA SPEECH, 1855.

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Sequoyah Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

Located at the Intersection of U.S. 41 and Ga. 225. Calhoun, Ga.

(Text on Monument)

SEQUOYAH

Originator of the Cherokee Indian alphabet.

Two miles east of this spot is New Echota, the last

Indian capital in Georgia, where Sequoyah lived.

Here was published the “Cherokee Phoenix” only

newspaper edited in an Indian language. Indian

cemetery is at New Echota where was signed

important treaty ceding lands to the United States.

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Emma Sansom Monument


Source: Fred Atkinson

Located on Ga. 11 at the Social Circle city limit/Walton County line signs

IN MEMORY OF

EMMA SANSOM

HEROINE OF THE 60’S

JAMES M. GRESHAM CHAPTER

SOCIAL CIRCLE GA.

COVINGTON CHAPTER

COVINGTON GA.

U. D. C.

1928

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Romulus and Remus Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Bronze replica of original Romulus and Remus sculpture at the Pallazio Del Conservatori in Rome, Italy, presented to Rome, Georgia on July 30, 1929. Placed on a base of white marble from Tate, Ga., the replica was accompanied by a brass plaque that says:

“This statue of the Capitolene Wolf, as a forecast of prosperity and glory, has been sent from Ancient Rome to New Rome during the consulship of Benito Mussolini in the year 1929.”

The story of why Rome was given the replica began in 1928, when the American Cotillion Company decided to build a rayon plant in Rome. Because the company was a joint American-Italian undertaking, Italian premier Benito Mussolini sent a block of marble from the ancient Roman Forum inscribed with “From Old Rome to New Rome” to be used as the cornerstone of the new rayon plant.

Rome’s American Cotillion facility opened in April 1929. Three months later, the Romulus and Remus replica statue was presented to the city, which erected it in front of the city hall. In 1940, reacting to Mussolini’s alliance with Hitler, the Rome city commission removed the statue and replaced it with an American flag. In 1952, the statue was restored to its former location.

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Richard Russell Marker


Source: Ed Jackson

As part of the ceremonies dedicating the newly completed Lake Richard B. Russell, this granite marker was unveiled showing the bust of Sen. Russell along with the inscription:

RICHARD B. RUSSELL

DAM AND LAKE

DEDICATED SEPTEMBER 7, 1985 The marker is located near the visitor’s center at the base of the dam

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Franklin D. Roosevelt Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

Monument to Franklin D. Roosevelt on the grounds of the Hall County Courthouse square in Gainesville, Ga. On this side, the following dates are inscribed:

APRIL 9, 1936

NOV 25, 1937

The first date is the day Roosevelt visited Gainesville following a terribly destructive tornado that hit the city three days earlier. The second date presumably is the day that the monument was dedicated.

On the reverse side of the monument is a historical plaque that tells about Roosevelt’s involvement in helping Gainesville recover from the tornado.

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Old Ebenezer Marker


Source: Ed Jackson

In Effingham County, in a forest area just off Ga. Hwy. 275 stands a small granite stone marking the site of the original Salzburger settlement of Ebenezer. The marker simply says:

SITE

OF

OLD EBENEZER

1734 - 1736

When it was erected and by whom is not indicated on the marker, although it is believed to have been placed there in the late 1970s.

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James Oglethorpe Residence Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

In 1933, Glynn County erected a stone marker on what was believed to be the site of James Oglethorpe’s residence on St. Simons Island. The inscription on the marker reads:

JAMES EDWARD OGLETHORPE

FOUNDER AND FIRST GOVERNOR OF GEORGIA

ESTABLISHED HERE IN 1736

THE ONLY HOME HE HAD IN AMERICA

ERECTED BY CITIZENS OF GLYNN COUNTY - 1933

The marker is located today just east of the entrance to Fort Frederica National Monument.

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James Oglethorpe Marker (Lexington)


Source: Ed Jackson

In 1993, Oglethorpe County celebrated its 200th anniversary. In conjunction with the county’s bicentennial, county officials erected a granite monument in recognition of Georgia founder James Oglethorpe. The monument is located in front of county courthouse in Lexington. Its inscription reads as follows:

IN HONOR OF

GEN. JAMES EDWARD OGLETHORPE

OGLETHORPE, THE FIFTH [sic] COUNTY CREATED IN GEORGIA, DEC. 19, 1793 WAS NAMED FOR JAMES EDWARD OGLETHORPE, FOUNDER AND FIRST GOVERNOR OF GEORGIA.

BORN IN LONDON, DEC. 22, 1696, OGLETHORPE STARTED HIS EARLY LIFE IN GODALMING, ENGLAND. HE WAS A PHILANTHROPIST, SOLDIER AND MEMBER OF HOUSE OF COMMONS.

OGLETHORPE ARRIVED WITH THE FIRST GEORGIA COLONISTS AT YAMACRAW BLUFF ON FEB. 12, 1733, AND STARTED THE SETTLEMENT OF SAVANNAH. AS WAR THREATENED BETWEEN ENGLAND AND SPAIN, OGLETHORPE DEFEATED THE SPANIARDS AT THE BATTLE OF BLOODY MARSH, JULY 1742.

OGLETHORPE DIED IN CRANHAM, ENGLAND JUNE 30, 1785 AND IS BURIED WITHIN ALL SAINTS PARISH CHURCH.

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James Oglethorpe Monument (Jasper)


Source: David Seibert

James Oglethorpe Monument

Located on Main St. across the street from the Old Jail one block north of the courthouse, Jasper

In 1930. this 38-foot marble monument was erected atop Mount Oglethorpe in Pickens County as an early celebration of the 1933 bicentennial of Georgia. Eventually, lightning, weather, and vandals had caused severe damage to the monument. In the late 1990s, it was removed to Jasper and world-famous sculptor Eino began work on its restoration. In 1999, the monument was re-erected on Main St. across from the Old Pickens County Jail. Counting the three concentric circles at the base, the monument stands over 42 feet in height. In 2001, a historical marker about the monument was erected near its base.

The base of the monument’s shaft is square, with a bas relief of James Oglethorpe, the state seal, a map of Georgia, and the scales of justice on the four sides. Beneath the image of Oglethorpe is the inscription:

IN GRATEFUL RECOGNITION

OF THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF

JAMES EDWARD OGLETHORPE

WHO BY COURAGE, INDUSTRY AND

ENDURANCE FOUNDED THE

COMMONWEALTH OF GEORGIA IN 1732

DEDICATED JULY 25, 1930

(Note: The monument was completed in the spring or early summer of 1930, with an anticipated dedication date of July 25. However, the dedication was delayed until a road could be constructed to the summit of Mount Oglethorpe and a nearby lodge completed for officials and guests attending the ceremony to stay. The actual dedication took place October 23, 1930.)

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Crawford Long Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue of Dr. Crawford Long located on the Madison County courthouse square in Danielsville, Ga. Long, who in 1842 became the first physician to use anesthesia during surgery, was born in Danielsville in 1815. The marble statue was erected in 1936.

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Charles Lindbergh Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

Sculptor: William Thompson

Charles Lindbergh Monument

Located at Souther Field on Ga. 49 several miles north of Americus, Ga.

(Text of Historical Marker at Monument)

LINDBERGH’S SOLO FLIGHT May 1923

The “Lone Eagle” first flew solo in early May, 1923 from Souther Field. Charles Lindbergh had come to Americus to purchase a surplus aircraft from the World War I training center. He chose a Curtiss JN4 “Jenny.” He got the plane with a brand-new OX-5 engine, a fresh coat of olive drab dope, and an extra 20 gallon fuel tank for $500. Lindbergh had less than 20 hours instruction when he soloed. He practiced take-offs and landings for a week; then having filled up with forty gallons of gas, he set course for Montgomery, Alabama, to start his barnstorming career. Four years later Lindbergh flew alone in the “Spirit of St. Louis” from New York to Paris and into aviation history.

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LaFayette Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue of Lafayette in the Town Square, LaGrange

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James Jackson Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

James Jackson Monument is situated on the Jackson County Courthouse Square in Jefferson, Georgia

(text)

JAMES JACKSON

LAWYER, PATRIOT,

HERO OF THE

AMERICAN REVOLUTION,

GENERAL OF GEORGIA MILITIA,

CONGRESSMAN,

TWICE GOVERNOR,

TWICE U.S. SENATOR,

AUTHOR OF THE 1798

STATE CONSTITUTION,

DESIGNER OF THE STATE SEAL,

AND “PRINCE OF DUELIST.”

“IF YOU CUT MY HEART OUT,

YOU WILL FIND GEORGIA

ENGRAVED ON IT.”

James Jackson

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Joel Chandler Harris Marker


Source: Ed Jackson

Brass Marker Honoring Joel Chandler Harris

on Putnam County Courthouse Square in Eatonton

The marker contains the following inscription:

IN HONOR OF

JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS

1848 - 1908

“UNCLE REMUS”

MOST DISTINGUISHED SON OF

PUTNAM COUNTY

AND BELOVED

OF ALL THE WORLD

BORN AT EATONTON, GA.

DECEMBER 9, 1848

ERECTED BY SAMUEL REID CHAPTER

DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

1923

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Fort King George Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

On June 29, 1940, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources acquired a tract of land along the bluffs of the Altamaha River near Darien in order to create the Fort King George State Park. It was here over two centuries earlier that Col. John Barnwell had built an English fort to defend the southern frontier. Shortly after acquiring the land, the department’s Division of State Parks, Historic Sites, and Monuments erected a marble monument with the inscription:

TO THE SOLDIERS OF FORT KING GEORGE

TO THE SOLDIERS OF FORT KING GEORGE WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN DEFENSE OF THE SOUTHERN ENGLISH FRONTIER IN AMERICA DURING THE OCCUPATION OF THIS LITTLE OUTPOST FROM 1721 TO 1727, AND WERE BURIED UPON THIS BLUFF. FORT KING GEORGE, BUILT ON THE LOW GROUND 200 YARDS EAST OF HERE, WAS THE FIRST ENGLISH SETTLEMENT IN THE LAND WHICH IS NOW GEORGIA. MORE THAN 140 BRITISH SOLDIERS LOST THEIR LIVES IN THIS FIRST PLANNED EFFORT TO HOLD THE OLD SOUTHEAST FOR ENGLISH SPEAKING PEOPLE.

Nearby, the state has built a museum and reconstructed the blockhouse of the old fort.

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Fort Augusta Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

Located near the downtown bank of the Savannah River, this granite monument marks the site of Fort Augusta. The inscription states:

THIS STONE MARKS THE SITE

OF THE

COLONIAL FORT AUGUSTA

BUILT BY ORDER OF

GENERAL OGLETHORPE

AND THE TRUSTEES

IN 1735;

AND KNOWN,

DURING THE REVOLUTION AS

FORT CORNWALLIS.

ST. PAUL’S CHURCH WAS BUILT

IN 1750.

UNDER A CURTAIN OF THIS FORT.

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First Capitol Marker


Source: Ed Jackson

This granite marker is located on the grounds of the Jefferson County Courthouse in Louisville, Ga. It recalls the fact that Georgia’s statehouse once stood on these grounds. The inscription reads:

TO COMMEMORATE

THE SITE OF THE FIRST PERMANENT

CAPITOL OF GEORGIA

BUILT IN 1785, AND BEFORE WHOSE DOOR

THE YAZOO FRAUD PAPERS

WERE BURNED WITH FIRE DRAWN

FROM HEAVEN, FEBRUARY 15, 1796

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William Few Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

Marble monument honoring William Few on the grounds of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Augusta. The marker is inscribed:

COLONEL

WILLIAM FEW, JR.

1748 – 1828

Soldier

Patriot

Statesman

Banker

Humanitarian

William Few came to Georgia in 1776 and served in the militia as a lieutenant colonel. During the American Revolution, he was elected twice to the state legislature, also serving in the Continental Congress (1780-1782). After the war, Few served both in the Georgia and national legislature. In 1787, he served as one of Georgia’s delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. Afterwards, he again served in the General Assembly before being appointed a federal judge. In 1799, Few moved to New York, where he died in 1828.

In 1973, Few’s remains were brought back to Georgia, where he was buried in the churchyard of St. Paul’s Church in Augusta. The above monument was erected to mark his grave site.

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Egg Man Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

This statue of a man gathering eggs and a young girl is located at the entrance to the Forsyth Government Complex in Cumming, Ga. It was created to commemorate the poultry industry in Forsyth County. It was sculpted by Gregory Johnson and dedicated January 1997.

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Brer Rabbit Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Brer Rabbit Statue on the Putnam County Courthouse Grounds

Eatonton, Georgia

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Battle of Bloody Marsh Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

Stone monument on St. Simons Island commemorating the victory of James Oglethorpe’s forces over a Spanish invasion force at the Battle of Bloody Marsh. The monument is on dry land at the edge of the marsh where the July 1742 battle was fought.

On the monument is a brass plaque that states:

WE ARE RESOLVED NOT TO SUFFER

DEFEAT - WE WILL RATHER DIE LIKE

LEONIDAS AND HIS SPARTANS - IF WE

CAN BUT PROTECT GEORGIA AND CAROL-

LINA AND THE REST OF THE AMERCANS

FROM DESOLATION – OGLETHORPE

ERECTED ON THE BATTLEFIELD OF

BLOODY MARSH BY THE GEORGIA

SOCIETY OF COLONIAL DAMES OF AMERICA

AND THE GEORGIA SOCIETY OF COLONIAL

WARS IN MEMORY OF THE GREAT VICTORY

WON OVER THE SPANIARDS ON THIS SPOT

JULY 7 - 1742

TIFFANY & CO.

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Athena Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

In 1996, this statue of Athena was dedicated in front of the Athens Classic Center in Athens. It bears the inscription

THE ATHENIAN OATH

We will never bring disgrace

on this our City by an act of

dishonesty or cowardice.

We will fight for the ideals

and Sacred Things of the City

both alone and with many.

We will revere and obey the

City’s laws and will do our best to

incite a like reverence and respect

in those above us who are prone to

annul them or set them at naught.

We will strive increasingly to

quicken the public’s sense of

civic duty.

Thus in all these ways we

will transmit this City, not only

not less, but greater and more

beautiful than it was transmitted

to us.

This oath was taken by the youth

of ancient Athens when they reached

the age of seventeen.

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Abraham Baldwin Statue


Source: Charles Pou

This statue of Abraham Baldwin was dedicated on UGA’s North Campus on September 16, 2011. The inscription on the base reads:

ABRAHAM BALDWIN

1784-1807

FIRST PRESIDENT

THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

A GIFT OF THE UGA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

DEDICATED SEPTEMBER 16, 2011

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John Wesley Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Bronze statue of John Wesley located on Reynolds Square in Savannah. Wesley came to Georgia as an Anglican to minister to Georgia colonists in Savannah. Returning to England, he later founded the Methodist Church. Georgia Methodists erected this statue in 1969.

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Waving Girl Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Bronze statue of Florence Martus (1869 - 1943), known as “Savannah’s Waving Girl” because of her practice of waving to ships entering and leaving Savannah’s harbor. Her statue is located on the bluff overlooking the Savannah River at the south end of downtown Savannah’s riverfront area.

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Tomochichi Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

In 1733, Yamacraw chief Tomochichi allowed James Oglethorpe and the first Georgia colonists to settle on Yamacraw Bluff, where they built the town of Savannah. Tomochichi became a close friend and important ally to Oglethorpe. After the chief’s death in 1739, James Oglethorpe had Tomochichi buried in Percival Square, which was later renamed Wright Square. In 1899, on the 160th anniversary of Tomochichi’s death, Georgia’s Colonial Dames arranged to have this granite boulder from Stone Mountain placed near Tomochichi’s burial site. On the stone memorial is a round plaque which states the following:

IN MEMORY OF

TOMO - CHI - CHI

THE MICO OF THE YAMACRAWS

THE COMPANION OF OGLETHORPE

AND THE FRIEND AND ALLY OF THE

COLONY OF GEORGIA

THIS STONE HAS BEEN HERE PLACED

BY THE GEORGIA SOCIETY OF THE

COLONIAL DAMES OF AMERICA

1739 - 1899

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Casimir Pulaski Monument


Source: Photo: Ed Jackson

The following article appeared in the July 10-16, 1998 issue of the Savannah Georgia Guardian and is reprinted with permission.

Pulaski Problems Persist: Monument Preservation Effort Requires More Money, New Statue

by Margarita Venegas

For some Monterey Square residents it’s hard to remember what the Pulaski Monument that stood just outside their front doors looks like, much less the anticipation and excitement they had upon learning it would be restored.

About 10 Savannah residents showed up for a meeting July 7 presented by Dr. Don Gardner, director of the city’s park and tree department, that explained the history of damage to the monument, how far along the project was and future plans for Pulaski and other local monuments.

“The Pulaski Monument was one of four monuments we identified when looking at the conservation of those with the most severe problems out of the 43 the city has,” Gardner said.

The first monument the department looked at, the sphere in Troup Square, was restored with few problems. The second, the Beacon Range in Morrell Park received one-half of the funds needed for restoration from the city, but the project cannot begin until the CSX Corp. gives the department the other half of the funds, which it has already pledged to do.

When reviewing the deterioration on the Pulaski Monument, Gardner’s staff noticed numerous cracks in the surface, but could not make a full assessment of the cost until it was brought down and looked at piece by piece. The original estimate was just under $200,000, and since the city had already given that amount for the Beacon Range, Gardner borrowed the money with the purpose of replacing it once the Pulaski restoration was finished.

However, no one counted on the damage that was to be found, damage so great that the statue of Lady Liberty that sits atop the monument and the ornate capital just under her feet will have to be replaced with replicas. The originals will remain in the Savannah History Museum, Gardner said.

“Over a three-year period, about 70 pounds of marble were lost from the top of the monument because when the capital was carved the sculptors had to exaggerate the leaves and scrolls in order for the work to still have an impact and be seen from the ground level,” Gardner said. “This made it very delicate. The problem is they pushed the stone further than it could take.”

Not only will creating a replacement statue take more money than originally planned, but once Gardner and his staff began to take the monument down, the cost of restoration rose considerably. There were five issues that they had to deal with in taking it apart, which will also affect how it is pieced back together.

The first issue the department faced was that the Carrara marble that the monument was made of was not the finest quality, therefore it had both coarse and fine grains, which meant pollution, rain and other elements could easily lodge in the stone over time.

The stone was also stressed because when it was carved with a hammer the shock vibrations weakened it as time passed and some of the blocks were at angles, which defied their normal bedding plane. This meant, for example, that a stone with a horizontal structure might have been placed vertical, leading to unnatural weight distribution and fissures when another stone was placed on top.

Perhaps the most disturbing revelation was when the department found that the column blocks and the foundation of the monument were not solid in the middle, so as to distribute weight evenly, but hollow and precariously perched.

“This was stacked like a house of cards,” Gardner said. If the monument had been left standing, it would have eventually fallen as the elements continued to deteriorate the condition. Currently, the monument and the original iron fence surrounding it are being repaired at the Roundhouse and a private studio, but about $500,000 more is needed to complete the project and return money to the Beacon Range fund.

Monterey Square residents at the meeting announced they hope to present this issue to the Savannah City Council July 16 in an attempt to receive city funds. Tepid public and political support has meant that funding the Pulaski restoration has fallen low on the list of city priorities, however residents believe some money should be taken from tourism profits to repair the monument since one of the attractions for tourists is the historic squares.

Even if the money to finish the project was available within the month, it would take until March 1998 to complete restoration, Gardner said. However, once the project is finished, he hopes the city will be able to make better plans for future restoration. “We are trying to set up an endowment fund to take care of future expenses,” Gardner said.

Erection of the Pulaski Monument

The cornerstone of the Pulaski Monument was placed in ceremonies on the afternoon of Oct. 11, 1853. Present for the occasion were Savannah militia units, local Masonic lodges, and a large number of citizens. Henry Williams delivered the main address, after which William Bowen read the following tribute to Pulaski:

“This parchment is to record the laying of the corner-stone of a Monument in the centre of Monterey Square, at the junction of Bull and Wayne streets, (City of Savannah) to the memory of Brigadier-General County Pulaski, who fell mortally wounded by a swivel shot while on a charge at the head of a body of cavalry before the British lines, at the Siege of Savannah, on the ninth day of October, seventeen hundred and seventy-nine.

“Count Casimir Pulaski was born in the province of Lithuania, Poland, in the year seventeen hundred and forty-six. Arrived in the United States in the year seventeen hundred and seventy-seven (1777), and volunteered his service to the American Government in the great and glorious cause of Liberty and Freedom from British tyranny – received a commission from the Government as Brigadier-General of Cavalry, and fought gallantly in the battles of this country at Brandwine, Germantown, Trenton, Charleston, and Savannah. Aged 33.

“Robert E. Launitz, of New-York, Designer. M. Lufburrow and E. Jones, builders of the foundation.

“Robert D. Walker, sculptor of the corner-stone.

(Signed)

“Richard D. Arnold, Chairman of Commissioners.

“Wm. Robertsons, by Geo. Robertson, Jun., Treasurer.

“Wm. P. Bowen, Sen., Secretary and Commissioner.”

Time Capsule

Savannah citizens contributed a number of items to be placed in a copper box placed in the corner stone. Although no date for the box’s opening was set, this may have been the first time capsule in Georgia history. According to historian George White, the contents of the copper box consisted of:

“Roll of the officers of the Independent Volunteer Battalion of Savannah, together with rolls of the several volunteer corps composing said battalion.

“Statement of the Marine and Fire Insurance Bank. Last report and list of stockholders, together with notes of the denominations one, two, five, ten, twenty, fifty, and one hundred.

“Statement of the Bank of the State of Georgia, with notes of five and ten dollars.

“Bills of the Planters’ Bank, of the denominations of five and ten.

“Bills of the Central Railroad and Banking Company, of the denominations of one, two, five, and ten.

“Statement of the Bank of Savannah, also notes of the denominations of five, ten, twenty, fifty, and one hundred dollars.

“Names of the Officers of the Governments of the United States and of the State of Georgia.

“Engraved likenesses of Generals George Washington, Benjamin Lincoln, and of Robert Morris, Esq.; presented by I.K. Tefft.

“Medal representing a view of the city of Bremen, with a statue of Rolandi, dated 1540; also, medallions of Benjamin Franklin and Henry Clay; presented by A. Oemler.

“Medallion representing the Crystal Palace of New-York; presented by W.A. Richmond.

“Hungarian Bond; presented by Hinko Naklen Kazel.

“A piece of the oak tree from Sunbury, Liberty County, Georgia, under which General James Oglethorpe opened the first Lodge of Free Masons in Georgia; also under which, in 1779, the charter of the Union Society was preserved, and Mr. Mordecai Sheftall, Sen., then a prisoner of war, elected President; presented by Mrs. Perla Sheftall Solomons.

“Copies of the Savannah Republican, of October 1, 1853, giving an account of the exhumation of the corner-stone laid by General La Fayette in 1825; also of the 11th of October, 1853.

“Copies of the Savannah Daily Morning News, of the 4th, 6th, and 11th of October, 1853.

“Copies of the Savannah Georgian, established in 1817.

“Past Master’s Masonic Jewel, dated 1710; presented by S.P. Bell, Esq.

“A silver dollar, found among the bones of soldiers who fell at the siege of Savannah, dated 1778; presented by Barnard Constantine, Esq.

“A badge, medals, and copper coin; presented by Mrs. David Thompson.

“Two Roman coins of the days of Constantine, Emperor of Rome; presented by Benjamin Arnold.

“Gold, silver, and copper coin; presented by A. Oemler, N. Wolf, J.N. Prentiss, C.F. Preston, P.G. Thomas, R.W. Pooler, T. Holcombe and F.J. Rosenberg.

“Three German coins, dated 1623, 1624, and 1632, presented by Paul Haller.

“French Masonic Lodge Jewel; presented by William Hone.

“A silver dollar, dated 1727; presented by A. Bonand.

“One cent, dated 1793; presented by J.H. Damon.

“Two silver medals; presented by John J.W. Buntz and George J. J. Buntz.

“Continental notes, by Mrs. David Thompson; and rare coin, by R.R. Scott, Esq.

“Directory and Census of the City of Savannah for the year 1853; presented by David H. Galloway, Esq.

“Officers and assistants of the Savannah Post-office.

“Constitution, by-laws, list of officers and members of Zerubbabel Lodge, No. 15.

“Records of the Georgia Chapter, No. 3.

“Records of Clinton Lodge, No. 54 – list of officers and members; and a silver compass.

“Records of Solomon’s Lodge for the year 1853, with by-laws, &c.”

Letter by Pulaski Monument Designer

Robert Launitz, designer of the Pulaski Monument, provided details of the monument in a letter to the Pulaski Monument Commission:

“Gentlemen: – I herewith have the honour to submit, according to your proposals, a design for a monument to the memory of Count Pulaski, consisting of an elevation and perspective view. In designing the Monument, I have had particular regard to purity of style, richness of effect, and strength and durability in material and execution; while I have not lost sight of the main object, which is to design a Monument for Pulaski.

“It is perceived at the first glance that the monument is intended for a soldier, who is losing his life fighting. Wounded, he falls from his horse, while still grasping his sword. The date of the event is recorded above the subject. The coat of arms of Poland and Georgia, surrounded by branches of laurel, ornament the cornice of two sides, or fronts; they stand united together; while the eagle, emblem of liberty, independence, and courage, rests on both, bidding proud defiance – the eagle being the symbolic bird of both Poland and America. The allegory will need no further explanation. The cannon reversed on the corners of the die, are emblematical of military loss and mourning, while they give the monument a strong military character.

“To facilitate the execution of the shaft, which it would be impossible to execute in one piece, I have divided the same into several parts, separated by bands, so as to remove the unsightliness of horizontal joints on a plain surface. The bands are alternately ornamental with stars, emblems of the States and Territories, now and in embryo, which enjoy and will enjoy the fruits of the valor and patriotism of the heroes of the Revolution. The garlands on the alternate bands above the stars denote that they (the States) are young and flourishing. The shaft is surmounted by a highly elaborate cap, which adds richness, loftiness, and grandeur to the structure. The monument is surmounted by a state of Liberty, holding the banner of the ‘stars and stripes.’ The love of liberty brought Pulaski to America; for love of liberty, he fought; and for liberty he lost his life; – and thus I thought that Liberty should crown his monument, and share with him the crown of victory. The garlands surrounding the column show that Liberty now is a young and blooming maiden, surrounded with fragrant flowers.

“The monument is designed to be fifty-five feet high, which, for a square in a city, is of ample height. The two steps and lower plinth to be of granite; and all the rest, of the finest Italian marble, in solid blocks weighing from one to six tons, and to be executed in the most artistical and workmanlike manner; to rest on a solid foundation six feet deep, or more, if the soil requires it. The first step to be the twelve pieces, the second step in eight pieces, as also the plith, of best hammered granite. The base-block in four pieces, the base moulding in two pieces. the die with the cannon in four pieces, jointed at the sides; each front will weigh five tons. the cornice in two pieces; the base-block of shaft, as well as every section of the shaft, each in one solid piece; the cap of shaft in two pieces; the statue and columns each part in one piece. All the parts that are composed of more than one piece to be cramped with dovetail keys of metal. The monument to be delivered and erected in Savannah in two years, say on or before the 1st of July, 1854. [The statue was completed in Dec. 1853.] The cost of the whole, as above specified, to be seventeen thousand dollars.”

Source: George White, Historical Collections of Georgia (New York: Pudney & Russell, 1855), pp. 308-312.

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Savannah Olympic Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Bronze statue erected to commemorate Savannah’s hosting of the yachting venue for the 1996 Summer Olympic Games. The statue is located adjacent to the “Waving Girl” statue on the bluff overlooking the Savannah River at the south end of downtown Savannah’s riverfront area.

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James Oglethorpe Bronze Bust


Source: Ed Jackson

This bronze bust of Georgia founder James Edward Oglethorpe is displayed in the Bay St. home of Solomon’s Lodge No. 1 of the Free and Accepted Masons in Savannah. Because Oglethorpe helped organize the lodge on Feb. 21, 1734, modern-era members commissioned this bust.

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James Oglethorpe Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Daniel Chester French created this bronze statue of Georgia founder General James Edward Oglethorpe, which is located in Chippewa Square in Savannah and was unveiled on Nov. 23, 1910. The nine-foot statue stands atop a pedestal on which is carved a portion of the charter of the colony. A lion holding a shield is located on each corner of the base. On these shields are found Oglethorpe’s coat of arms and the seals of the colony, the state, and the city of Savannah. New York architect Henry Bacon designed the pedestal and base. A few years later he and French team up to produce the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. For the Oglethorpe statue, French examined the variety of existing portraits and engravings of Oglethorpe and also studied contemporary military uniforms of Oglethorpe’s era. The image he chose to portray was not Oglethorpe the colonizer but Oglethorpe the military commander. Undoubtedly, his resulting statue is the most handsome and heroic rendering of Georgia’s founder, who depicted facing southerward, looking toward the Spanish threat from Florida. French accurately portrayed Oglethorpe in the military dress of the 1740s – with a cuirass (shoulder and breast plates), sword, waistcoat, high boots, and tricorn hat.

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Original Jewish Cemetery Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

This marble monument located on Bull Street and Oglethorpe Avenue near downtown Savannah is inscribed:

ORIGINAL 1733 BURIAL PLOT ALLOTTED BY

JAMES EDWARD OGLETHORPE

TO THE SAVANNAH JEWISH COMMUNITY.

Erected by Trustees of the Mordecai Sheftall Cemetery Trust

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William Jasper Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

This statue commemorates Sgt. William Jasper, who died trying to save the unit flag of the Second South Carolina Regiment during the siege of Savannah in 1779. Located on Madison Square in Savannah, the monument was dedicated in 1888.

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Nathanael Greene Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

Monument commemorating Revolutionary war hero Nathanael Greene located on Johnson Square in Savannah. In appreciation for his role, the state of Georgia awarded Greene with Mulberry Grove Plantation near Savannah. In 1786, Greene died of sunstroke and was buried in Colonial Park Cemetery. In 1902, the remains of Greene and his son were removed to Johnston Square and reburied within the base of a new monument built in his honor.

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William Washington Gordon Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

This monument commemorates William Washington Gordon (1796 - 1842), founder and president of Georgia’s first railroad – the Central Railroad and Banking Co. Located on Wright Square in Savannah, the monument was designed by architects Henry Van Brunt and Frank M. Howe, and completed in 1883.

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Forsyth Park Fountain


Source: Ed Jackson

Historic water fountain in Savannah’s Forsyth Park

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Zero Mile Post Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

Zero Mile Post Monument

Located within the Georgia Building Authority police headquarters on the first floor of the Central Ave. parking garage immediately adjacent to the southern entrance to Underground Atlanta. The GBA facility is separated from Underground Atlanta by a wall, so you will need to enter the main entrance of the parking garage from Central Ave. and then ride the elevator down to the first floor.

(Text)

W & A

R.R.

0 0

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Thomas Talbot Monument


Source: Ed Jackson

Located at Grant Park, Atlanta

(text)

ERECTED BY THE MEMBERSHIP OF

THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION

OF MACHINISTS, MAY 5, 1943, TO

THE MEMORY OF ITS FOUNDER,

THOMAS WILSON TALBOT

1849 - 1892

THROUGH WHOSE EFFORTS CAME LIGHT

OUT OF DARKNESS AND HOPE OUT OF

DESPAIR. AND THAT GENERATIONS TO

COME MIGHT EXTOL HIS GREATNESS,

THIS MONUMENT IS SOLEMNLY

DEDICATED TO FREE MEN EVERYWHERE

WHO TOIL FOR A LIVELIHOOD.

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Phil Niekro Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

This bronze statue of Braves Hall of Famer Phil Niekro shows the grip he used on his famous knuckle ball. Located outside the northern entrance to Turner Field in Atlanta, the statue includes a plaque that states:

PHIL “KNUCKSIE” NIEKRO

Five times an All-star, Phil was always an All Star to Atlanta and

baseball fans everwhere. He won 318 games in a 24 year Major

League career, including a 9-0 no-hit victory in Atlanta-Fulton

County Stadium on August 5, 1973. He struck out 3,342 batters in

864 games. Led N.L. in games started 4 times, in complete games 4

times, and in victories twice. Phile and brother Joe, the winningest

brothers in Major League history, won a combined record total

539 M.L. games.

“There’s no better Braves fan anywhere than I.”

– Phil Niekro

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“The Flair” Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Bronze statue by R. MacDonald completed in 1996 prior to the Atlanta Summer Olympics and located just east of the Georgia Dome in the Georgia World Congress Center complex. At the base of the statue is a brass plaque that states:

“The great tradition of Western art has been and should continue to be, not merely representational work but the idealization of the human form, the glorification of both heroic individuals and the heroic possibilities of mankind.” –Pierce Rice

The Flair is dedicated to the Olympic athletes and all those who exemplify determination and dedication in the pursuit of excellence. The Flair celebrates the triumph of the human spirit and reflects the Olympic credo that the essence lies not in the victory but in the struggle.

During the Flair Across America nationwide tour, The Flair reached out to thousands, inspiring all who witnessed the beauty and strength of this heroic monument.

The Flair is a gift of the artist to the state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is is dedicated on July 8, 1996 with gratitude to Governor Zell Miller, Mayor Bill Campbell, GWCC Executive Director Daniel Graveline, and the hundreds of people who, by believing in a vision, made the Flair Across America project possible.

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Ty Cobb Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

This bronze statue of Ty Cobb aggressively sliding into a base, located outside the northern entrance to Turner Field in Atlanta, was sculpted by Felix de Weldon in 1977.A plaque with the statue bears this inscription:

TYRUS RAYMOND COBB

1886 - 1961

KNOWN AS THE GEORGIA PEACH

CHARTER MEMBER OF

BASESBALL HALL OF FAME

LEADING BATSMAN OF

ALL MAJOR LEAGUE HISTORY

.367 AVERAGE, 4,191 HITS

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Hank Aaron Bust


Source: Ed Jackson

This bronze bust of Hank Aaron, located outside the northern entrance to Turner Field in Atlanta, includes a plaque on a marble base that bears this inscription:

PRESENTED TO

THE CITY OF ATLANTA

IN COMMEMORATION OF THE

OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTIONS OF

HENRY LOUIS AARON

TO THE GAME OF BASEBALL

AND TO THIS CITY

THE CITIZENS AND SOUTHERN NATIONAL BANK

THE GEORGIA MARBLE COMPANY

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Hank Aaron Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

This bronze statue shows Hank Aaron hitting his 715th–and Major League record–home run in April 1974. Located outside the northern entrance to Turner Field in Atlanta, the statue was sculpted by Ed Dwight Jr. in 1982. A plaque at the base of the statue states the following:

HENRY LOUIS “HANK” AARON

715TH HOME RUN

APRIL 8, 1974

ATLANTA-FULTON COUNTY STADIUM

DEDICATED

SEPTEMBER 7, 1982

SCULPTOR - ED DWIGHT, JR.

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Tom Watson Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Bronze statue of Tom Watson outside main entrance to Georgia’s state capitol bears this inscription:

THOMAS E. WATSON

BORN SEPT. 5TH 1856

DIED SEPT. 26TH 1922

HONOR’S PATH HE TROD

EDITOR, LAWYER, HISTORIAN,

AUTHOR, ORATOR, STATESMAN.

AUTHOR OF

RURAL FREE DELIVERY

A CHAMPION OF RIGHT WHO

NEVER FALTERED IN THE CAUSE.

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World War I and II Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue to honor Georgians who fought in World War I and II. It is located in the northeastern area of Georgia’s state capitol square.

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Vietnam War Memorial


Source: Ed Jackson

Located in front of the James H. “Sloppy” Floyd Veterans Memorial Building (Twin Towers) across the street from the Georgia state capitol, Georgia’s Vietnam Memorial contains the following inscription:

THIS MEMORIAL IS DEDICATED TO THOSE GEORGIANS

WHO FOUGHT, DIED AND ARE STILL MISSING IN ACTION

IN SOUTHEAST ASIA. THEY ANSWERED THEIR COUNTRY’S

CALL TO DUTY WITH COURAGE AND SACRIFICE AND THEY

SHALL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN.

The memorial was dedicated Nov. 1988.

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Herman Talmadge Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue of former Georgia governor and long-time U.S. Senator Herman Talmadge, located across the street from the main entrance to Georgia’s state capitol.

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Eugene Talmadge Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Located on the southeastern corner of the grounds of Georgia’s state capitol, the statue has this inscription:

EUGENE TALMADGE

1884 - 1946

FARMER - LAWYER

STATESMAN

ELECTED GOVERNOR OF

GEORGIA ON FOUR

SEPARATE OCCASIONS

A SUPERB ORATOR

A SAFE BUT PROGRESSIVE

ADMINISTRATOR

OF PUBLIC TRUST

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Richard Russell Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue of former Georgia governor and long-time U.S. Senator Richard B. Russell, located near the main entrance to Georgia’s state capitol.

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James Oglethorpe Bust


Source: Ed Jackson

Bust of Georgia founder James Oglethorpe sculpted by Felix Weihs in 1940 and present by Sir Eric Underwood of London to Georgia in 1941. Underwood was cousin of Marvin Underwood, a federal judge who lived in Atlanta. The bust was unveiled in formal ceremonies on the state capitol grounds and accepted by Gov. E.D. Rivers. Later, the bust was moved to the interior of the capitol, where it was placed on the landing of the stairs from the second to third floors in the northern wing of the capitol.

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Margaret Mitchell Bust


Source: Ed Jackson

Marble bust of Margaret Mitchell sculpted by Eleanor Platt located in the Georgia Hall of Fame at the state capitol.

Georgia author and journalist Margaret Mitchell was born on Nov. 8, 1900 in Atlanta, where she lived her entire life except for a brief two-year stay at Smith College (1918-19). After a failed marriage in 1922, she married John Marsh in 1925. Mitchell took a job with the Atlanta Journal as a feature writer for their Sunday Magazine. While she was admired by the people she worked with (Erskine Caldwell among them), a number of accidents, mostly car accidents, kept her out of work frequently. It was during one these respites, sitting at home with a broken ankle, that Mitchell began writing a historical novel set in Atlanta before, during, and after the Civil War. After finishing the novel, which she entitled “Tomorrow is Another Day,” she set the manuscript aside without even trying to sell it. Then in 1935, an editor for the Macmillan Company “dug up” – in Mitchell’s own words – the manuscript and was convinced it would be a bestseller. Mitchell spent several months rewriting and revising her work, with publication set for April 5, 1936. As word of this work spread, it soon became obvious that the original printing of 10,000 would not be sufficient, so the publication date was moved back, first to May 5, then to June 30. The Book-of-the-Month Club selected it as their July selection even before it was published. Finally, on June 30, 1936, Margaret Mitchell’s epic historical novel was published, renamed Gone With the Wind. By December of that same year, total sales had already exceeded one million. In May 1937, Mitchell was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for her epic novel. Since then worldwide sales of Gone With the Wind have exceeded thirty million. It has been printed in twenty-seven languages in 37 countries, with some 180 different editions. David O. Selznick purchased the film rights to the book within a month of its publication. By her own choice, Mitchell had no involvement in the filming of the movie, the popularity of which has equaled that of the book. The film premiered in Atlanta on December 15, 1939. While Mitchell was present for the premier, she was uncomfortable with all the media attention. But the success of her work meant she could no longer live as an average Atlanta housewife. She spent her time answering mail and trying to avoid curiosity seekers. She helped nurse her father and husband through years of invalidism, a task that prevented her from doing more writing.

On August 11, 1949, Mitchell was struck by a taxi while crossing a street three blocks from her home. She died from the injuries on August 16, and is buried in Atlanta’s Oakland Cemetery. In 1986, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the release of her book, the U.S. Postal Service issued a Margaret Mitchell stamp.

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Mary Latimer McLendon Fountain


Source: Ed Jackson

Mary Latimer McLendon marble fountain placed in the south wing on the main floor of Georgia’s state capitol by the Women’s Christian Temperance Union in 1923 bears this inscription:

MARY LATIMER MCLENDON

JUNE 24, 1840 - NOVEMBER 20, 1921

MOTHER OF SUFFRAGE IN GEORGIA

PIONEER LEADER IN THE TEMPERANCE CAUSE

SHE MADE THE WORLD A WIDER WORLD FOR

WOMEN A SAFER WORLD FOR ALL MANKIND

SHE HAD THE WILL TO SERVE AND BEAR

LOVE TO DO AND DARE

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Juliette Gordon Low Bust


Source: Ed Jackson

This bronze bust of Girl Scout founder Juliette Gordon Low appears in the Georgia Hall of Fame in the state capitol.

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Statue of Liberty


Source: Ed Jackson

Bronze replica of the Statue of Liberty given to the state by the Atlanta Council of the Boy Scouts of America in February 1951, located on the northwest corner of Georgia’s state capitol grounds.

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Ben Hill Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue of U.S. and Confederate senator Ben Hill. Dedicated on May 1, 1886, the statue was originally located in downtown Atlanta. Later, it was moved to Georgia’s state capitol grounds–and still later to the northern wing of the main floor of the capitol.

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John B. Gordon Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

John B. Gordon (1832-1904) rose to the rank of lieutenant general in the Confederate Army – one of only three Georgians to achieve that rank. Subsequently, he served in the U.S. Senate, became a railroad promoter, served as governor of Georgia (and was the first to occupy the office in the newly completed state capitol), and returned to the U.S. Senate.

A few days after Gordon’s death, Solon H. Borglum, brother of Gutzon Borglum (who was involved initially in the Stone Mountain sculpture), was commissioned to do a bronze statue of Gordon. Borglum designed the statue based on a photograph of Gordon sitting erect on his horse Marye. The statue was located on the northwest corner of the square block on which the state capitol is located, where it remains today. It was unveiled in ceremonies on May 25, 1907. Reportedly, it is the only equestrian statue in Atlanta.

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“Miss Freedom” Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue representing freedom and liberty atop Georgia’s state capitol. While much about the statue is mystery, it is most commonly identified as “Miss Freedom,” although a newspaper account from the time of the capitol’s construction referred to the statue as the “Goddess of Liberty.”

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Georgia Guidestones


Source: Ed Jackson

Located 7 miles north of Elberton in Elbert County (“Granite Capital of the World”) is a mysterious 19-foot-high monument consisting of six granite slabs sitting atop a seventh (and submerged) stone base known as the Georgia Guidestones. Carved into the sides of the six standing stones is the following message translated into 11 other languages (ancient Sanskrit, Babylonian cuneiform, Egyptian hieroglyphics, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Arabic, Chinese, Russian, Spanish, and Swahli):

MAINTAIN HUMANITY UNDER 500,000,000 IN PERPETUAL BALANCE WITH NATURE.

GUIDE REPRODUCTION WISELY – IMPROVING FITNESS AND DIVERSITY.

UNITE HUMANITY WITH A LIVING NEW LANGUAGE.

RULE PASSION–FAITH–TRADITION–AND ALL THINGS WITH TEMPERED REASON.

PROTECT PEOPLE AND NATIONS WITH FAIR LAWS AND JUST COURTS.

LET ALL NATIONS RULE INTERNALLY RESOLVING EXTERNAL DISPUTES IN A WORLD COURT.

AVOID PETTY LAWS AND USELESS OFFICIALS.

BALANCE PERSONAL RIGHTS WITH SOCIAL DUTIES.

PRIZE TRUTH–BEAUTY–LOVE–SEEKING HARMONY WITH THE INFINITE.

BE NOT A CANCER ON THE EARTH – LEAVE ROOM FOR NATURE – LEAVE ROOM FOR NATURE.

Although suggestive of the ancient Stonehenge complex in England, the Georgia Guidelines is of relatively recent origin. In June 1979, an anonymous man who identified himself as “Mr. Christian” (because of his religion) approached the president of the Elberton Granite Finishing Co. and indicated that he represented a group of non-Georgians who wanted to erect a granite monument dedicated to the conservation of humanity. The identify of that man, the author of the message, and the financial backers of the Georgia Guidestones remain a closely guarded secret.

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Expelled Because of Color Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue to honor black legislators expelled because of their race from the Georgia General Assembly during Reconstruction. It is located in the northeastern area of Georgia’s state capitol square.

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Jimmy Carter Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue of Jimmy Carter in honor of his four years as president of the United States, located just to the north of the main entrance to Georgia’s state capitol.

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Georgia State Capitol Pediment


Source: Ed Jackson

Pediment above the main entrance to the Georgia state capitol shows state coat of arms on a shield in center flanked by two classic figures or muses on either side.

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Gov. and Mrs. Joseph E. Brown


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue of Georgia Civil War governor Joseph E. Brown and his wife – said to be of the few husband-and-wife statues in the world. It is located on southwest corner of the Georgia state capitol square.

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Ellis Arnall Statue


Source: Ed Jackson

Statue of former Georgia governor Ellis Arnall, located near the main entrance to the state capitol in the southwestern corner of the capitol grounds.

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