Carroll County


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Carroll County was of five counties created by a June 9, 1825 act of the General Assembly. The act did not name the counties but rather designated the boundaries of five numbered sections and provided for the survey of each section into land districts and lots. Naming of the counties did not occur until Gov. Troup signed an act of Dec. 11, 1826. However, if the date of the 1825 act establishing its boundaries is considered the date of Carroll County's creation, it is Georgia's 65th county.

The five counties were created from land ceded by the Treaty of Indian Springs on Feb. 12, 1825 by a group of Creeks led by William McIntosh. McIntosh had signed away all Creek lands in Georgia (except for four reserves) without approval of other Creek factions, an action which led to his assassination. On Jan. 24, 1826, the Creeks signed a new agreement -- the Treaty of Washington -- in which they again ceded the lands in question but declared void the Treaty of Indian Springs. A Supplementary Article, signed on Mar. 31, 1826, corrected some errors in the treaty, resulting in an additional cession of land that only affected what would become Carroll County.

Later, the legislature used portions of Carroll County to create the following counties: Campbell (1828), Heard (1830), Haralson (1856), and Douglas (1870).

Carroll County was named for Charles Carroll of Maryland, who at the time was the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence. Originally, the county was larger than it is today. However, the legislature took portions of Carroll County to help form Campbell, Douglas, Haralson, and Heard counties.

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